Friday, March 19, 2010

Never Say Never by Lisa Wingate

Drama, romance, and a little bit of laughter is found in this book which falls under the genre of chick lit.

I can't say that I enjoyed reading this book. It took over 100+ pages for character development and background. I stuck it out in order to get to the enjoyable part,and during the next 100+ pages, I started to enjoy the story only to be frustrated by the turn of events in the last 100+ pages.

It seemed the writer took too long writing the back story that the conclusion of the book felt rushed. What the characters did at the end of the story did not support the character development at the beginning of the story.

Also, there were too many characters in the story. I was so confused about who the story was about. I am still not sure who the protagonist is. I think both Kai and Donetta experienced life changing situations, but neither one of them seemed to be plausible characters in real life. Instead of writing 2 books about 2 women, it was one book about both women that did not really allow the development of either woman to really progress.


To comply with new regulations introduced by the Federal Trade Commission, I must post that while Bethany House has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book to review, the opinions are all mine.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Homeschooling for the Rest of Us by Sonya Haskins

Speaking from many years of experience, Sonya Haskins shares the insides and outs of homeschooling. This book is for anyone who is considering homeschooling as well as anyone who is homeschooling. She gives practical advice on what works and what does not work.

What I enjoyed the most was the honest look at homeschooling. It is not easy and does require a lot of work. Chapter 9: Living in a (Very) Messy House says it all. I do not have to be perfect and that is a liberating concept.

In addition to the book, the author maintains a nice website that is helpful to anyone homeschooling. The book refers to this and a few other helpful websites without being pushy about it, and the book has plenty of information on its own.


To comply with new regulations introduced by the Federal Trade Commission, I must post that while Bethany House has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book to review, the opinions are all mine.

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

The Flowering Cross by Beth Ryan

The illustrations by Renee Graef are a beautiful complement this Easter story.

A young girl and her family share God's love more through actions and less through words. The cranky neighbor learns about God through their loving kindness in this simple yet inspiring story.

This book is an example of the truth of 1 Timothy 4:12, "Don't let anyone look down on you because you are young, but set an example for the believers in speech, in life, in love, in faith, and in purity." Sharing God's love is not limited by age, by knowledge, or by experience. We can all be witnesses to those around us speaking love through good deeds.

I like the idea of a flowering cross and appreciate the instructions given in the book. I enjoy anything that helps to make God's truth more concrete to young children.


To comply with new regulations introduced by the Federal Trade Commission, I must post that Thomas Nelson has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book to review.

Monday, March 8, 2010

What Your Son Isn't Tellling You

by Michael Ross and Susie Shellenberger

As a mother of a preteen boy, I need all the help I can get to understand him and what he is going through. This book did gave me a ton of information about the many issues that teen boys face today. No issue is off limits and the authors tell it to you straight up. There is no question that boys today face significant challenges, and it will not be easy for young men to stay faithful and true.

The authors mention early on in the book how communicating with a teen/tween boy is not easy. These boys do not talk much and do not listen well. I have certainly experience that. However, the authors then spend the rest of the book sharing with the reader all the things boys struggle with and how we, as moms, need to talk to our sons to help them overcome. I find it confusing to be told that in order to help my son, I need to talk with him more yet communicating effectively is where we struggle.

The most eye-opening thing I read was on page 15, "In this day and age of high-tech toys and low-tech values, sin is packaged, downloaded, and made accessible to the masses as never before." If that doesn't put us on our knees to pray for our sons and for the men in our lives, I don't know what will.


To comply with new regulations introduced by the Federal Trade Commission, I must post that Bethany House has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book to review.